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Rainforest Solutions Project wins prestigious Fuller Challenge for Great Bear Rainforest conservation

Great Bear Rainforest. Photo: Andy Wright

Great Bear Rainforest. Photo: Andy Wright

Tides Canada project Rainforest Solutions Project (RSP) is the recipient of the prestigious 2016 Fuller Challenge from the Buckminster Fuller Institute. The Challenge awards $100,000 for work that pushes the boundaries of socially responsible design and considers ecological, economic, and social impacts.

RSP is a longtime project on Tides Canada’s shared platform and is a unique coalition consisting of Greenpeace, Sierra Club BC, and Stand.earth. For over 15 years, RSP was instrumental in the collaboration between the Government of BC, First Nations, environment organizations, and logging companies to develop a new conservation approach in the Great Bear Rainforest called Ecosystem-Based Management.

The Great Bear Rainforest is now protected under historic agreements, which laid out the most comprehensive conservation and commercial forest management plan in all of North America. The agreements ensure the preservation of 85 per cent of 15 million acres of old-growth forests in the Great Bear Rainforest.

Congratulations to RSP and all parties involved on winning the Fuller Challenge. Read more about the award here.

Learn more about our work in the Great Bear Rainforest and surrounding region here.

Interview with Tara Marsden, Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs Office

Gitanyow is a community nestled along the Kitwanga River in Northwestern BC. They are represented by the Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs to establish modern treaties and implement First Nations conservation practices and land use planning for their territory. We interviewed Wilp Sustainability Director for the Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs Tara Marsden and learned more about the Gitanyow model of long-term conservation planning, the significance of observing and adopting First Nations values and methods in conservation, and the importance of flexible, multi-year granting.

Community stories share local food successes in northern Manitoba

928 kilometres north of Winnipeg, Manitoba lies Barren Lands First Nation and Brochet. Facing high food costs, the community of just over 600 people expanded on an already existing interest in gardening by building a 14 x 20-foot greenhouse in 2013 in coordination with their local health centre and the Northern Manitoba Food, Culture, and Community Collaborative (NMFCCC). This is only one of many inspiring examples from the NMFCCC 2016 Community Stories booklet, which shares learnings from 18 communities.